The Holy Spirit (Part Twenty-four)

Acts 10:37-38

You know what has happened throughout the province of Judea, beginning in Galilee after the baptism that John preached—how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power, and how he went around doing good and healing all who were under the power of the devil, because God was with him (NIV).

One of the difficulties of presenting biblical teaching in a survey form, like this series about the Holy Spirit, is the presentation of teaching without an adequate understanding of the context. The message of the Bible is the story of God’s glory in Christ through salvation by judgment. Please invest some time in reading Acts 10:17- 48 to grasp the immediate context of this greater story. In his message to his Gentile audience, Peter had to familiarize his audience with the narrative of the Bible to show how God acted in Christ to bring salvation to all nations. Peter explained as an eyewitness how he saw Jesus as he fulfilled God’s plan for his glory. We must never forget this underlying purpose. It is God’s story that we need to listen to and then accept by faith in Christ. We do not read verses merely to collect information. We listen to the Spirit of God speak through chosen men to tell God’s message. As this happens, we learn truth about God and ourselves that can transform us. Peter was not giving an informational talk but one that was transformational. Again, I urge you to read the passage.

What are the Four Gospels? They are God’s written testimony to what God did in his Son to save his people to glorify his name. In the Gospels, we read of God the Son in true humanity coming to set up a new humanity from the wreck of the old creation. It is not by accident that John and Mark start their Gospels with words referring to this “new beginning”. John, more profound and theological, starts from the time of the first creation and briefly sketches history up to the entrance of the Son. Mark, more powerful and direct, drives the point home immediately. Matthew and Luke, after setting the arrival of the Son in history, refer to the purpose of God in the coming of the Son as announced in the Old Testament Scriptures (Matthew 4:12-17; Luke 4:16-21). Part of the purpose of the Old Testament Scriptures is to show the wreck that human sin has made of everything and our absolute need for a better Redeemer, a better Mediator, and a better Priest than occurred in the wreck of the ages past.

My point in mentioning this is to open up the practical importance of this article. Diamonds are very beautiful, but to enjoy their beauty people set them in place—in a ring, on a necklace, or some other kind of jewelry. The Lord Jesus Christ is the surpassing diamond. And the Father has provided the jewelry of the Gospels to enjoy his beauty until we see him face to face. You and I need to know that the Son of God, in fulfillment of the Father’s purpose, came to set up a radically new age in history. The Bible, like the facets of a diamond, speaks of this great change in various ways: the new creation, the new age, the kingdom of God, and the new covenant. We need to know that God has made us part of this by his grace to us in Christ. And we need to know that to live in this new age involves living by faith in the crucified, risen and ascended Christ in the Holy Spirit poured out on us. Here Peter presents the power of the Spirit of God during the earthly ministry of the Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. We are part of something glorious! Since we are, we should listen well. And we should live accordingly.

Grace and peace, David

God’s Reassuring Promise (Part One)

Genesis 46:1-7

The setting of this scene is the happy reunion that Joseph had with his brothers, and his encouragement to them to come to Egypt. There he promised to provide for them. Pharaoh and his high officials approved of Joseph’s plan, and likewise encouraged Joseph’s family. Truly God was at work in their hearts that they would so readily receive foreigners into their land.

Older dispensational theology considered the event spoken of in this section to be the final climatic failure of man under the so-called “dispensation of promise.” According to that view, mankind had failed to live by promise; now God will put mankind under a new test, the Law. However, I think it will be clearly evident, as we consider this section, that it teaches no such thing. There is not a hint of rebuke by the Lord to Jacob for what he does. No other Scripture condemns him either. Instead, we find God reassuring Jacob to proceed with the plan suggested by his son Joseph. What really took place was this. In the plan of God announced to Abraham (Genesis 15:13-14), the time for Israel’s entrance into Egypt had arrived. The Lord himself spoke to encourage Jacob to not shrink back from this time.

First, we Jacob’s faith in action (46:1). So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead (James 2:17 ESV). He had to believe in God’s word through his son Joseph. His faith had to overcome a great obstacle. He believed Joseph had been dead for twenty years. Think of the way that Jacob had lived based on that misinformation for twenty years! He had to come to a complete change of mind now. In a similar way, the unbelieving sinner has lived on wrong ideas his or her whole life. When brought by grace to Christ, a thorough change of mind occurs. It is a long process to work this change of mind out in all areas of life with actions appropriate to repentance.

Jacob’s faith was strengthened by the evidence presented. He received the word of Joseph (45:27; cf. 45:9-11; 37:11). He saw the carts that were sent to take him to Egypt. We have like evidence. We have the written word of God and what it tells us of the Risen Christ. After his suffering, he presented himself to them and gave many convincing proofs that he was alive. He appeared to them over a period of forty days and spoke about the kingdom of God (Acts 1:3).

His faith impelled Jacob to set out for Egypt. What good would it have been to say, “I believe God can provide for me and my family,” and not leave for Egypt to get the provision? True faith in God is accompanied by believing activity. A true faith in Jesus Christ goes to Him for the free gift of righteousness, and then lives according to the gift received.

Jacob’s faith included worship. He found a suitable place to worship. We who live in the new covenant and worship by the Spirit of God (John 4:21-24) ought to remember a different way of worship applied to all believers who lived before Jesus the Messiah appeared. This can help understand various passages, like Psalm 84.

It was a place where the Lord had appeared to his father Isaac and promised his blessing. There was an altar there (Genesis 26:23-25). Jacob approached God in a suitable manner of worship. Jacob offered sacrifices to the Lord as the godly seed had since the time of Abel. Now we have a better sacrifice, which says, “It has been paid in full! Christ is your righteousness and way to God” (cf. Ephesians 3:12). Because of Christ’s finished work of redemption, we can approach the Holy God boldly and joyfully. We can rely on him through all of life’s unexpected twists and turns, and turnarounds.

Grace and peace, David